Monthly Archives: November 2012

RTL1090 ADS-B Decoder for Windows

Thanks to the folks over at Jetvision.de we have a very nice ADS-B decoder for Windows that works with RTL2832U sticks called RTL1090. Unlike the Ubuntu, GNU Radio, gr-air-modes combination, it’s fast and easy to install under Windows. For those who want to experiment with the ADS-B hobby but were a bit intimidated by the complexity of the software, RTL1090 is for you. The software allows a RTL2832U stick to emulate a Beast ADS-B receiver. Beast Mode is compatible with Plane Plotter and Virtual Radar Server ADS-B software. RTL1090 also will decode Mode A/C for those who may be interested in that. The software is still under development so features may change and improve, but it appears to work extremely well at this time.…

Building an Inexpensive ADS-B Receiving and Sharing Station

Introduction

ADS-B Aircraft Monitoring can be a fascinating hobby, allowing you to view live tracks of some nearby aircraft within a 100 miles or more in your area. Some hobbyist also like to share their data with networks that provide this information to the general public. ADS-B monitoring can be an expensive hobby with ADS-B receivers alone going in the $200 to $800 range plus the cost of a computer system to process, display aircraft positions, and possibly share the data. Thanks to recent advances is using certain inexpensive Digital Video Broadcast – Terrestrial (DVB-T) dongles as Software Defined Radios, it is now possible to create very inexpensive versions of ADS-B receivers and sharing systems. This article will show you how you can create your own complete ADS-B receiving and sharing station for less than $200. This is done using some inexpensive off the shelf computer hardware and a RTL2832U DVB-T stick. The price of this project can vary greatly depending on what you may already have on hand, what hardware options you choose, and where you shop for parts. This article will try to keep the price around $200 or less. You don’t have to be a computer expert …

Ham it Up HF Converter

Introduction
How would you like to have a very good HF SDR receiver with a wide spectrum display covering 2MHz or more for about $75? Well, you can when you combine the Ham it Up HF Up-converter with a RTL2832U stick. NooElec is selling an HF Up-Converter board based on an open hardware design in conjunction with Opendous Inc. for about $50 plus shipping. The Up-converter board basically converts HF signals to the FM band (specifically 100.5 MHz to 150 MHz) allowing your RTL2832U to tune in the HF signals. When used in conduction with SDR Sharp or HDSDR you are able to receive HF signals in AM, USB, LSB, CW, and other modes. HDSDR gives you roughly the same functions found on most better HF receivers like noise blanking, automatic gain control, variable filters widths, etc. These inexpensive HF up-converters are nothing new. There have been many designs floating around in either DIY form or completed boards. However, the Ham It UP converter looks like the first product produced in quantity and is available  directly from NooElec in the US. I purchased the Ham it Up HF converter for testing from NooElec and it arrived very quickly.…

Alternative Installation Procedure for RTL Sticks and HDSDR

There is a new ExtIO.dll available for supporting HDSDR with RTL2832U based SDR sticks. This makes setting up HDSDR with these sticks a lot simpler and it also appears to perform much better. The installation only requires installing the Zadig drivers for you stick and placing one file into the HDSDR directory. I was having difficulty with HDSDR and audio dropouts with the older installation method, but using the new ExtIO.dll corrected the problem. If you have been having difficulty with HDSDR working properly, I would suggest you try this ExtIO.dll file. Here are the instructions:…